How to Use the Oval-8 Sizing Set to Size Your Patients

Posted on Thu, Apr 16,2015 @ 11:06 AM

Oval-8 Finger Splints provide a highly effective finger orthosis that stabilizes or limits finger joint motion to treat several conditions with a simple turn of the splint. The Oval-8 is uncomplicated, inexpensive, and often provides immediate relief to patients. Oval-8s come in a variety of sizes, and may be worn differently, to ease pain and correct problems associated with many conditions including, but not limited to:

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Tags: Oval-8 finger splint

Using a 3pp Toe Loop to Treat a Jammed or Broken Toe

Posted on Tue, Apr 07,2015 @ 02:31 PM

Buddy taping is an easy effective treatment for your patient’s stubbed, jammed, hyperextended, hyperflexed, hyperabducted, broken, or “turfed” toe? Proper buddy taping – taping the healthy toe next to the injured toe and taping the two together- helps prevent movement of the injured toe during the healing stage of rehabilitation.

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Tags: 3pp toe loop

Using a Carpal Lift NP for TFCC Injuries or Tears

Posted on Tue, Mar 24,2015 @ 03:23 PM

The Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex (TFCC) is a group of ligaments and cartilage on the ulnar side of the hand. The TFCC ligaments attach the cartilage to the small wrist bones which also suspend the ends of the two forearm bones, the ulna and the radius.

TFCC problems can be caused by a fall on an outstretched hand (a "FOOSH") or simply degeneration from overuse or the aging process.
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Tags: TFCC, carpal lift np

Treating Inflammation In Your Patients’ Hands

Posted on Thu, Mar 12,2015 @ 01:04 PM

It seems like everyone is talking about inflammation these days. You can’t open up a professional journal without seeing clinical evidence of its effect on the human body:

  • Brain inflammation has been linked to clinical depression.
  • New evidence links inflammation with hypertension.
  • Inflammation resulting from obesity is likely the root cause of diabetes.

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Tags: Treatment options, Inflammation

De Quervain’s Tenosynovitis - What’s new about an old condition?

Posted on Wed, Feb 25,2015 @ 12:43 PM

Recently, you may have been hearing about a new test for de Quervain’s Tenosynovitis. This test applies stress to the abductor pollicis longus (APL) and extensor pollicis brevis (EPB) tendons without stressing the thumb and wrist joints.

Along with this potential new testing standard for de Quervain’s, the terminology used to describe the condition is also being reconsidered.
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Tags: de Quervain’s Tenosynovitis, Thumb splints

Treating Swan Neck Deformity with Oval-8 Finger Splints

Posted on Thu, Feb 12,2015 @ 11:35 AM

At first glance, diagnosing Swan Neck Deformity seems like a "no brainer". You have visual confirmation of hyperextension of the proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint and flexion of the distal interphalangeal (DIP). The finger is contorted into the shape of a swan neck. And, your patient has Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA).

Yes. Swan Neck Deformity does show up in about half of all RA patients; but, there are a surprising number of other causes, including

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Tags: Treatment options, Oval-8 finger splint, Swan-neck deformity

3-Point Products sponsors TSHT 20th Annual Education Conference

Posted on Thu, Jan 29,2015 @ 10:02 AM

3-Point Products is proud to be a Silver Level sponsor of the Texas Society for Hand Therapy (TSHT) 20th Annual Education Conference. The conference will be held March 6-8, 2015 at the Embassy Suites in Fort Worth, TX.

Attendees, be sure to check your bag to find a special announcement and offer from 3-Point Products. You don’t want to be left out!

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Tags: 3-Point Products, Announcements

How to Treat Gamekeepers or Skier's Thumb

Posted on Tue, Jan 27,2015 @ 10:59 AM

The origin of the term Gamekeeper’s Thumb (the wringing motion required to break the neck of rabbits and game birds), may no longer be a common cause of the overstretching or tearing of the thumb’s ulnar collateral ligament, but the disorder itself is still quite common.

The term Gamekeeper’s Thumb is used when referring to an ulnar collateral injury caused by repetitive stress on the thumb during such activitiesas using a wrench, twisting electrical cords or wringing out heavy cloths. The term Skier’s Thumb is commonly used when there is an acute, forceful abduction of the thumb as when a skier falls without letting go of the ski pole. The injury may also be the result of falling on an outstretched thumb or catching a ball with an outstretched thumb.

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Tags: Treatment options, Gamekeepers thumb, Skiers thumb, Thumb splints

Treating Trigger Thumb with an Oval-8 Finger Splint

Posted on Fri, Jan 16,2015 @ 11:32 AM

And “pop” goes the trigger thumb. One of the most common causes of pain and dysfunction in the hand is trigger thumb.

With trigger thumb, patients present with a painful thumb that sticks or catches, often audibly, upon flexion or extension. Or, the patient’s thumb may be stuck or locked in the flexed position. Trigger thumb is thus named because once the thumb unlocks (often by passive manipulation), it snaps back much like discharging a trigger on a gun.

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Tags: Oval-8 finger splint, Trigger thumb

3-Point Products Joins the IFSHT

Posted on Tue, Jan 13,2015 @ 02:32 PM

3-Point Products joins the IFSHT3-Point Products is proud to join the International Federation of Societies for Hand Therapy (IFSHT) as a commercial member. By joining the IFSHT, 3-Point Products is committed to promoting the advancement of Hand Therapy worldwide through sponsorship of activities.

Julie Belkin, founder and CEO of 3-Point Products, said, “when my dear friend from Brazil, Maria Candida de Miranda Luzo introduced me to Sarah Ewald, president of the International Federation of Societies for Hand Therapy (IFSHT) at the ASHT meeting in Boston,

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Tags: 3-Point Products, Announcements, IFSHT

 

Our blogs are presented for informational purposes only and are not to be considered medical advice.  We will gladly answer questions or comments pertaining to any products mentioned in our blogs, however, we cannot provide a diagnosis or medical advice.